Winter Light

Glade in the mist

Glade in the mist

As the seasons change, autumn brings not just a change in colour, but also a change in the quality of the light. Summer light is bright and harsh, and the golden hour is either very early in the day or very late. As winter approaches it changes completely – now the sun is low all the time, with long shadows and a wonderful pastel, watery quality. The golden hour is at a civilised hour. The weather is interesting too – storms, clouds racing across the sky, and by way of contrast, perfectly still mornings and evenings with frost on the grass and mist rising in the river valley.

Don’t get me wrong – I love all the seasons, including summer – but winter light is probably the most photogenic.

These are just a few shots of the woods in winter light – low light through the trees, mist, stormy skies and mist rising at sunset. Perfect!

Mist rising at sunset

Mist rising at sunset

Mist through the trees

Mist through the trees

Storm approaching

Storm approaching

Ray of light with stormy sky behind

Ray of light with stormy sky behind

Mist through the trees

Mist through the trees

Mist and golden trees

Mist and golden trees

Main path in the mist

Main path in the mist

Mystical Winter Light

Mystical Light and Frosty Path

Mystical Light and Frosty Path

As a photographer, I am always interested in light.  So it might seem strange that I love the winter, because it tends to be dark and grim, at least in the UK.  However the quality of light at this time of year can be absolutely magical.  We all know of the golden hour near sunset and sunrise, when the light is warmer and more gentle, lighting subjects from a low angle.

Angled Shadows on path

Angled Shadows

However in winter in the UK, the light is always coming from a low angle because the sun never gets very high in the sky – and while it may not have the intoxicating warmth of a summer evening, it does have a lovely gentle and watery quality that simply isn’t available at any other time of year.

frosty-walk-102

As well as a low angle and gentle watery quality, winter light is also enhanced by the cold weather bringing mist, frost and occasional snow.  The other day I was privileged to walk round the woods at just the right time of day.  There had been a very heavy overnight frost which was melting in the sunshine, adding water vapour and mist to the sense of wonder.  There was also mist rising from the ponds and canal and settling in the flood plain where the woods are situated.

Sun on the boundary

Sun on the boundary

So we have the wonderful quality and angle of the light, frost, mist and the wonderful bonus of the trees without leaves.  The form of the trees can be clearly seen at this time of year too.  In summer, all is lost in the confusion of leaves, but right now, you can see every detail, every shape.  The shadows also have much more form than in summer.  The combination of light and form is quite intoxicating.  The beauty gives me a squeezy feeling in my stomach.

Winter light in the plantation

Winter light in the plantation

I took a series of landscape shots as I walked round, trying to capture that squeezy feeling – the mystical beauty of mist, light and trees.  You don’t get the mystical winter light every day, but when you do, it can take your breath away.

Frost Mist Trees and Shadows

Frost Mist Trees and Shadows

Winter colour in the plantation

Winter colour in the plantation

Wonderful Winter Sunsets

Pink Clouds and Glowing Trees

Sunset from the edge of our woods

Dark and glowing clouds as dusk falls

Dark and glowing clouds as dusk falls

The first frosts have been late this year, but winter seems to have arrived at last, and with it comes the wonderful, clear and low light that casts eerie shadows within the woods and across the landscape, and brings those amazing sunsets that simply don’t occur during summer.

We’ve been gifted with a few beautiful sunsets over the last few days.  The first came while we were working away cutting up, moving and stacking logs from a willow tree that had fallen into our neighbour’s field.  It was an absolutely miserable, rainy, drizzly, damp day.  But as we were walking back up from repairing the fence with some dead-hedging and stakes, the cold front finally passed, and a sunset started to happen.  I always have a camera, even if working, and I put my little EOS-M to good work along the edge of the woods, capturing the light, clouds, colours and shapes of sunset.

Yesterday, I had to take a few photos of trees on which we are planning to have tree surgery work done later during the winter.  Because our woods has a Tree Preservation Order on it, we have to submit an application for this work to the Council, supported by photos.  While I was there, I could sense the light getting better and better for photography.  First there was the sun-dog or false rainbow caused by ice crystals in the atmosphere refracting the sunlight.  Then there were the golden leaves remaining on the birch trees, backlit by the setting sun.  Finally there was the cold wait by our entrance as the sun started to set opposite.  Subtle colours, and few clouds, but spectacular none the less.  Although I guess a few passing motorists wondered why there was a mad woman shivering in a puffa jacket with a camera round her neck by the side of the road!

Low light is the real gift of winter.  It makes this time of year special.

Birch trees glow gold in Betty's Wood

Birch trees glow gold in Betty’s Wood

Sun Dog over Betty's Wood - the rainbow is not a photographic artefact

Sun Dog over Betty’s Wood – the rainbow is not a photographic artefact

Sunset over the hills opposite the woods

Sunset over the hills opposite the woods

The sun setting right opposite our entrance

The sun setting right opposite our entrance as I was leaving.

 

Untimely Signs of Spring

Salix caprea catkins starting to emerge - very early!

Salix caprea catkins starting to emerge – very early!

The winter has been extremely mild with very little sign of frost, and because of this, we are getting very early signs of spring at the woods.  On today’s walk, with temperatures in double figures (about 10 Celsius), I saw a lot of evidence that an early spring is happening – worrying evidence, in that we could still have a harsh winter come upon us!  First of all, I found willow catkins Salix caprea starting to emerge on some of the young trees in Betty’s Wood.  Not yet generating pollen, but not far off, and there are similarly advanced catkins on alder and birch as well.

These daffodils near our entrance are emerging early too

These daffodils near our entrance are emerging early too

Near the entrance to the woods we have a lot of naturalised daffodils and these are emerging rapidly too.  This is not the only clump – most of the daffodils are well advanced and looking good to flower early.

These hazel catkins are mature and releasing pollen

These hazel catkins are mature and releasing pollen

Finally, the hazel catkins, which have been around since December, are now mature and starting to shed pollen.  These are in the main woodland, but Betty’s Wood also has mature hazel catkins.  And I have hay fever already!

Last year spring was very late thanks to the harsh winter, this year it is very early.  There are other signs of spring all around – leaf buds looking ready to burst on our cherry and rowan trees, great-spotted woodpeckers drumming, great tits and blue tits singing their territorial songs.  We haven’t had enough frost to kill off the brambles, which have continued to grow all winter – worrying for the bluebells that rely on the bramble dying back in the frost to emerge into the light in spring.

But it is still winter, and the large flocks of fieldfare and smaller flocks of linnet and siskin are still feeding in our meadows and the adjoining fields.  Winter may still hit hard – last year it snowed in early May – so we will be interested to see how these early signs of spring develop.